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#1032193 - 06/17/20 07:50 PM Book on Steelhead
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 5855
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
Bob Hooton, the BC Bob, has written another book on steelhead. Days of Rivers Past. I have only scratched the first few chapters but it is basically a documentation of BC's loss of steelhead over the decades. Very depressing in what fishing, for wild fish, used to be. Bob also describes what happened, at least in the first few chapters I have read.

Truly sad that not only did the fish and habitat disappear but society did so with fairly open eyes. same as here.

Great pictures and stories to boot.

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#1032210 - 06/17/20 10:54 PM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
Salmo g. Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/08/99
Posts: 12920
I got that book last year when it became available. More than enough to make a steelheader cry. The difference between what was and what is can scarcely be comprehended.

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#1032213 - 06/18/20 07:14 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
DrifterWA Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 04/25/00
Posts: 4674
Loc: East of Aberdeen, West of Mont...

I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.
_________________________

"Worse day sport fishing, still better than the best day working"

"I thought growing older would take longer"

Top
#1032215 - 06/18/20 07:22 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: DrifterWA]
ArvidBarker Offline
The Crybaby King

Registered: 04/04/13
Posts: 3918
Loc: Monterey CA
I would rather not read it then. The rivers of a lost coast film depressed me enough. I fish the Eel every year and think about what it was like in the 30's. It's the cost of an ever expanding populous coupled with greed. We don't seem to learn.
_________________________
yawn...

Top
#1032216 - 06/18/20 07:36 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 5855
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
Although I doubt that we will, there are those who still have to try and fix things. It may almost be a sign of a mental illness.

Top
#1032220 - 06/18/20 08:23 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: ArvidBarker]
Salman Offline
Spawner

Registered: 03/07/12
Posts: 705
Originally Posted By: RabidAngler
I would rather not read it then. The rivers of a lost coast film depressed me enough. I fish the Eel every year and think about what it was like in the 30's. It's the cost of an ever expanding populous coupled with greed. We don't seem to learn.


If I remember there is sqauwfish in that river. Catch & kill them!
_________________________
Why build in the flood plain?

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#1032223 - 06/18/20 09:25 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: DrifterWA]
Salmo g. Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/08/99
Posts: 12920
Originally Posted By: DrifterWA

I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.



Not to pick an argument with you, but I wouldn't lay much blame on fishing. I'm not saying that over-fishing has not occurred at times, but it isn't the proximate cause of decline. That is because over-fishing can be cured by reducing fishing. And we have done that. Steelhead, like all salmonids, are very resilient fish. Diminished numbers can and do rebound quickly when the limiting factor is removed or corrected.

The thing that doesn't fix quickly is damaged and destroyed habitat. Fish simply cannot increase in numbers beyond the productivity and capacity of their habitat. Hooten covers so well in his book about the horizon to horizon clear cutting on Vancouver Island that exposed steep, unstable soils (sound familiar?) to heavy rains that produced record floods, that in some rivers, scoured out the gravel down to bedrock. And bedrock is not very productive for aquatic life.

He wrote about biologists sampling and tagging adult steelhead on the Englishman River, which is a small stream. They beach seined 126 adult steelhead in one pool to tag. The entire run in that river is probably less than 126 steelhead these days. The damage to watersheds is huge, and possibly irreversible in some, if not many, cases.

Top
#1032225 - 06/18/20 10:21 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 5855
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
I just read that chapter, Salmo. What Bob didn't add is that the current crop of managers will tell you that MSY escapement for the Englishman is probably 1-200, so it's not that far from recovery.


Bob did note that closures and C&R has done next to nothing to recover the fish now. The habitat is so in the porcelain Buddha.

Top
#1032228 - 06/18/20 11:09 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Salman]
ArvidBarker Offline
The Crybaby King

Registered: 04/04/13
Posts: 3918
Loc: Monterey CA
Originally Posted By: Salman
Originally Posted By: RabidAngler
I would rather not read it then. The rivers of a lost coast film depressed me enough. I fish the Eel every year and think about what it was like in the 30's. It's the cost of an ever expanding populous coupled with greed. We don't seem to learn.


If I remember there is sqauwfish in that river. Catch & kill them!
I have killed quite a few . One day I was stomping on a large squawfish and felt pretty bad for taking a life like that though so I am conflicted about it. The main problem with the eel was the poor logging practices coupled with the 1964 flood. The problem now is habitat degradation due to marijuana growers and an overpopulation of pinnipeds . It is such a pretty stream.
_________________________
yawn...

Top
#1032258 - 06/18/20 12:10 PM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: ArvidBarker]
Salman Offline
Spawner

Registered: 03/07/12
Posts: 705
Originally Posted By: RabidAngler
Originally Posted By: Salman
Originally Posted By: RabidAngler
I would rather not read it then. The rivers of a lost coast film depressed me enough. I fish the Eel every year and think about what it was like in the 30's. It's the cost of an ever expanding populous coupled with greed. We don't seem to learn.


If I remember there is sqauwfish in that river. Catch & kill them!
I have killed quite a few . One day I was stomping on a large squawfish and felt pretty bad for taking a life like that though so I am conflicted about it. The main problem with the eel was the poor logging practices coupled with the 1964 flood. The problem now is habitat degradation due to marijuana growers and an overpopulation of pinnipeds . It is such a pretty stream.


I saw an entire school of them hanging in a riffle when I was there about 20 years ago. If I knew then what I know now I would of cleaned it up.
_________________________
Why build in the flood plain?

Top
#1032379 - 06/19/20 09:25 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
Salmo g. Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/08/99
Posts: 12920
Originally Posted By: Carcassman
I just read that chapter, Salmo. What Bob didn't add is that the current crop of managers will tell you that MSY escapement for the Englishman is probably 1-200, so it's not that far from recovery.


Bob did note that closures and C&R has done next to nothing to recover the fish now. The habitat is so in the porcelain Buddha.


Pretty sad when recovery and contemporary carrying capacity are about 10% of historic abundance.

Top
#1032391 - 06/19/20 10:17 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 5855
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
Wanna help on a book on that?

Top
#1032394 - 06/19/20 10:28 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Salmo g.]
Denham Offline
Smolt

Registered: 05/30/15
Posts: 89
Loc: Maple Valley
Originally Posted By: Salmo g.
Originally Posted By: DrifterWA

I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.



Not to pick an argument with you, but I wouldn't lay much blame on fishing. I'm not saying that over-fishing has not occurred at times, but it isn't the proximate cause of decline. That is because over-fishing can be cured by reducing fishing. And we have done that. Steelhead, like all salmonids, are very resilient fish. Diminished numbers can and do rebound quickly when the limiting factor is removed or corrected.

The thing that doesn't fix quickly is damaged and destroyed habitat. Fish simply cannot increase in numbers beyond the productivity and capacity of their habitat. Hooten covers so well in his book about the horizon to horizon clear cutting on Vancouver Island that exposed steep, unstable soils (sound familiar?) to heavy rains that produced record floods, that in some rivers, scoured out the gravel down to bedrock. And bedrock is not very productive for aquatic life.

He wrote about biologists sampling and tagging adult steelhead on the Englishman River, which is a small stream. They beach seined 126 adult steelhead in one pool to tag. The entire run in that river is probably less than 126 steelhead these days. The damage to watersheds is huge, and possibly irreversible in some, if not many, cases.


No offense but out of all the talked about factors contributing to low steelhead returns I think "habitat loss" is the most overblown out of all of them. Washington state still has numerous rivers out on the OP which sport the same habitat quality as they did 200 years ago and yet their current returns are just as bad as the rest of the state. Then you look back 40 years ago to the 1980's when Puget Sound steelheading was at its peak. It didn't seem to matter back then what rivers had poor habitat because the Green and Puyallup were pumping out more fish than anywhere else and those are some of the most urbanized rivers in PS.

"Fishing" on the other hand still seems to be pretty prevalent. Between commercial fishermen, the tribes, and pinnipeds you have the three most productive groups of fisherman who all get a crack at these fish in whatever manner they please. They don't worry about what has a fin or not because its all fair game to them. On top of that we commercially fish for all the baitfish out in the ocean limiting what the salmon can eat in the first place.

I will say that recreational fishing on the other hand probably hasn't caused much damage in recent years largely in part because we haven't been given a chance. With all the emergency closures and 1-fish limits of hatchery only fish its hard to make a dent when you aren't given the chance to kill anything. Out of all the groups of fisherman out there I would definitely say that we are the least to blame.

Top
#1032400 - 06/19/20 10:55 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Denham]
SpoonFed Offline
Repeat Spawner

Registered: 01/29/19
Posts: 1202
Originally Posted By: Denham
Originally Posted By: Salmo g.
Originally Posted By: DrifterWA

I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.



Not to pick an argument with you, but I wouldn't lay much blame on fishing. I'm not saying that over-fishing has not occurred at times, but it isn't the proximate cause of decline. That is because over-fishing can be cured by reducing fishing. And we have done that. Steelhead, like all salmonids, are very resilient fish. Diminished numbers can and do rebound quickly when the limiting factor is removed or corrected.

The thing that doesn't fix quickly is damaged and destroyed habitat. Fish simply cannot increase in numbers beyond the productivity and capacity of their habitat. Hooten covers so well in his book about the horizon to horizon clear cutting on Vancouver Island that exposed steep, unstable soils (sound familiar?) to heavy rains that produced record floods, that in some rivers, scoured out the gravel down to bedrock. And bedrock is not very productive for aquatic life.

He wrote about biologists sampling and tagging adult steelhead on the Englishman River, which is a small stream. They beach seined 126 adult steelhead in one pool to tag. The entire run in that river is probably less than 126 steelhead these days. The damage to watersheds is huge, and possibly irreversible in some, if not many, cases.


No offense but out of all the talked about factors contributing to low steelhead returns I think "habitat loss" is the most overblown out of all of them. Washington state still has numerous rivers out on the OP which sport the same habitat quality as they did 200 years ago and yet their current returns are just as bad as the rest of the state. Then you look back 40 years ago to the 1980's when Puget Sound steelheading was at its peak. It didn't seem to matter back then what rivers had poor habitat because the Green and Puyallup were pumping out more fish than anywhere else and those are some of the most urbanized rivers in PS.

"Fishing" on the other hand still seems to be pretty prevalent. Between commercial fishermen, the tribes, and pinnipeds you have the three most productive groups of fisherman who all get a crack at these fish in whatever manner they please. They don't worry about what has a fin or not because its all fair game to them. On top of that we commercially fish for all the baitfish out in the ocean limiting what the salmon can eat in the first place.

I will say that recreational fishing on the other hand probably hasn't caused much damage in recent years largely in part because we haven't been given a chance. With all the emergency closures and 1-fish limits of hatchery only fish its hard to make a dent when you aren't given the chance to kill anything. Out of all the groups of fisherman out there I would definitely say that we are the least to blame.


Bingo! Well said denham.

Greed will be the demise of our fisheries.

Let's just catch the last baitfish and salmon in the sound for profit with no restrictions. Sounds foolproof.

Top
#1032536 - 06/20/20 10:34 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Denham]
Salmo g. Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/08/99
Posts: 12920
Originally Posted By: Denham

No offense but out of all the talked about factors contributing to low steelhead returns I think "habitat loss" is the most overblown out of all of them. Washington state still has numerous rivers out on the OP which sport the same habitat quality as they did 200 years ago and yet their current returns are just as bad as the rest of the state. Then you look back 40 years ago to the 1980's when Puget Sound steelheading was at its peak. It didn't seem to matter back then what rivers had poor habitat because the Green and Puyallup were pumping out more fish than anywhere else and those are some of the most urbanized rivers in PS.

"Fishing" on the other hand still seems to be pretty prevalent. Between commercial fishermen, the tribes, and pinnipeds you have the three most productive groups of fisherman who all get a crack at these fish in whatever manner they please. They don't worry about what has a fin or not because its all fair game to them. On top of that we commercially fish for all the baitfish out in the ocean limiting what the salmon can eat in the first place.

I will say that recreational fishing on the other hand probably hasn't caused much damage in recent years largely in part because we haven't been given a chance. With all the emergency closures and 1-fish limits of hatchery only fish its hard to make a dent when you aren't given the chance to kill anything. Out of all the groups of fisherman out there I would definitely say that we are the least to blame.


Denham,

You're not the only one who thinks the "habitat factor" is over blown. But you and those who do are wrong. Understanding steelhead population abundance requires acceptance and understanding that multiple factors are in play. You can likely walk and chew gum at the same time, so you can probably understand that more than one factor affects population abundance. This would be somewhat like multiple regression, where the factors influencing abundance are ranked in order of magnitude of the respective effects.

The reason habitat ranks at the top is because when habitat productivity and capacity are reduced by 80 to 90%, there really aren't that many fish being produced for other factors like fishing to rank very high in impact. Of course they can have a significant impact on the small population that remains, but that is a very different story, and near term, compared to the historical context of abundance going back about 200 years.

You say that WA still has numerous rivers out on the OP that have the same habitat quality as they did 200 years ago. Please, for my and everyone else's benefit here, name one. Just one. Because I don't know of one single OP river whose salmonid productivity and capacity has not been severely compromised.

When you refer to steelheading being at its peak in the 1980s, you're talking about a mix of hatchery and wild steelhead, which was a contemporary abundance that was only a shadow of historical abundance. You seem to be wearing blinders that only allow you to see a fraction of the larger picture. Also during the 80s, it looks like many wild steelhead populations were enjoying smolt to adult survival rates of about 5%. Today some of the populations can't even maintain one per cent. That's an 80% loss of what was already only 20% of historical abundance. That leaves only 4% of historical abundance, which pretty well explains why steelhead runs are currently so dismal.

While fishing is prevalent - relatively, but it used to be far more prevalent - the catching of steelhead is a tiny fraction of former run sizes. You refer to the Green and Puyallup as producing lots of steelhead in the 80s despite their poor habitat. I contend that if you count wild steelhead only, they were producing no more than 20% of their historical abundances, and likely a lot less. (Mud Mtn. Dam on the White and Howard Hanson on the Green had and continue to have major impacts on wild steelhead populations.) What you seem to think of as being pretty good steelhead production was actually very severely compromised production, compared to what historically existed.

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#1032569 - 06/20/20 12:45 PM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Denham]
WN1A Offline
Spawner

Registered: 09/17/04
Posts: 587
Loc: Seattle
It seems that a few basic facts get lost in the discussion about what is and has caused the decline in steelhead populations. First is that steelhead are anadromous rainbow trout. They evolved to go to saltwater because the freshwater habitat where they spawn is not productive enough to support a large population of adults. There is a reason that there are few if any steelhead in the Northwestern Alaska rivers but the rainbow trout populations are healthy.

Fact 2 is as a consequence of being anadromus the ocean is habitat and for many populations critical habitat because they may spend a high percentage of their life in the ocean. We all recognize climate change and ocean conditions impact marine fish. What we tend to ignore is pollution and plastics in the ocean. I saw an article that predicted that by 2050 the mass of the plastics in the ocean will be greater than the mass of fish. Steelhead are surface feeders and as such ingest a lot of plastic as well as plastics in the food that they eat. Anybody who has cleaned steelhead and looked at their stomach contents probably as seen plastic. It is not good for their body condition and has a negative impact on reproductive success. Plastics in any habitat is bad but in the ocean it is a disaster, we caused it and we have to recognize and live with it.

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#1032573 - 06/20/20 02:13 PM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Carcassman]
RUNnGUN Offline
Repeat Spawner

Registered: 12/06/07
Posts: 1058
Sad indeed. Reminds me of a quote I have used before.

"A curious thing happens when fish stocks decline: People who aren't aware of the old levels accept the new ones as normal. Over generations, societies adjust their expectations downward to match prevailing conditions."....Flatfish.

When I was young I scoffed at my grandpas negative fishing stories because fishing was still what I thought was good. I realize now where he was coming from, but never would have guessed it could get this bad in my lifetime.
_________________________

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#1032649 - 06/21/20 10:07 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: DrifterWA]
Numbqua Offline
Alevin

Registered: 10/29/15
Posts: 15
[quote=DrifterWA]
I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.

Better equipment is not one of the reasons for this region-wide decline.

Habitat loss,(which includes many things but definitely logging and climate change), using non-native broodstock for mitigation, horrific co-management in terms of harvest accountability, crafting seasons when pre-run forecasts made it clear reaching the e goals wasn’t possible, allowing pretty much anyone to become a “guide”, weak and totally ineffective “enforcement” of regulations.

Those of you who think the rivers and streams of the Olympic Peninsula still have habitat that resembles what it was 200 years ago are delusional and completely clueless. You need to wake up and smell the coffee.

Top
#1032650 - 06/21/20 10:27 AM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Denham]
Numbqua Offline
Alevin

Registered: 10/29/15
Posts: 15
Originally Posted By: Denham
Originally Posted By: Salmo g.
Originally Posted By: DrifterWA

I'm sure its a "good read".......Living in Grays Harbor for 54 years, I watched in real time the dismise of wild steelhead in the Region.

Hoh, Queets, Quinualt, Humptulips, Wishkah, Wynoochee, Satsop were rivers that I caught wild steelhead on. My largest was 26# 11 oz., weighted at the river by a biologist, early 80's, Spring vacation but no camera......grrrr

Caught a 23+ pound on the Satsop....never placed in the SH Derby......

Lot's of things added to the decline of wild steelhead......better equipment, more boats(drift and jet), increase in number of guides, tribal nets, habitat, and just more people fishing.



Not to pick an argument with you, but I wouldn't lay much blame on fishing. I'm not saying that over-fishing has not occurred at times, but it isn't the proximate cause of decline. That is because over-fishing can be cured by reducing fishing. And we have done that. Steelhead, like all salmonids, are very resilient fish. Diminished numbers can and do rebound quickly when the limiting factor is removed or corrected.

The thing that doesn't fix quickly is damaged and destroyed habitat. Fish simply cannot increase in numbers beyond the productivity and capacity of their habitat. Hooten covers so well in his book about the horizon to horizon clear cutting on Vancouver Island that exposed steep, unstable soils (sound familiar?) to heavy rains that produced record floods, that in some rivers, scoured out the gravel down to bedrock. And bedrock is not very productive for aquatic life.

He wrote about biologists sampling and tagging adult steelhead on the Englishman River, which is a small stream. They beach seined 126 adult steelhead in one pool to tag. The entire run in that river is probably less than 126 steelhead these days. The damage to watersheds is huge, and possibly irreversible in some, if not many, cases.


No offense but out of all the talked about factors contributing to low steelhead returns I think "habitat loss" is the most overblown out of all of them. Washington state still has numerous rivers out on the OP which sport the same habitat quality as they did 200 years ago and yet their current returns are just as bad as the rest of the state. Then you look back 40 years ago to the 1980's when Puget Sound steelheading was at its peak. It didn't seem to matter back then what rivers had poor habitat because the Green and Puyallup were pumping out more fish than anywhere else and those are some of the most urbanized rivers in PS.

"Fishing" on the other hand still seems to be pretty prevalent. Between commercial fishermen, the tribes, and pinnipeds you have the three most productive groups of fisherman who all get a crack at these fish in whatever manner they please. They don't worry about what has a fin or not because its all fair game to them. On top of that we commercially fish for all the baitfish out in the ocean limiting what the salmon can eat in the first place.

I will say that recreational fishing on the other hand probably hasn't caused much damage in recent years largely in part because we haven't been given a chance. With all the emergency closures and 1-fish limits of hatchery only fish its hard to make a dent when you aren't given the chance to kill anything. Out of all the groups of fisherman out there I would definitely say that we are the least to blame.





You are not very well informed about the habitat on the Olympic Peninsula. Most people aren’t because they don’t make a living working as a habitat/stock assessment biologist. In reality, it has been very well documented that when compared to even 50 years ago, these OP streams have a drastically reduced carrying capacity in regards to natural production of wild salmonids. You really need to get out there and observe what has happened.

Talk to some professionals that have made spent decades documenting, monitoring, and observing this massively depressing phenomenon.

Top
#1032658 - 06/21/20 12:45 PM Re: Book on Steelhead [Re: Numbqua]
DrifterWA Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 04/25/00
Posts: 4674
Loc: East of Aberdeen, West of Mont...
"You are not very well informed about the habitat on the Olympic Peninsula. Most people aren’t because they don’t make a living working as a habitat/stock assessment biologist. In reality, it has been very well documented that when compared to even 50 years ago, these OP streams have a drastically reduced carrying capacity in regards to natural production of wild salmonids. You really need to get out there and observe what has happened.

Talk to some professionals that have made spent decades documenting, monitoring, and observing this massively depressing phenomenon."


Well you might be right, on the informed bit but I can tell you this.....My whole teaching career was at Aberdeen High School, my rooms were on the 2nd floor of the Phillips Building, they faced to the South.....toward the Chehalis River...I could not "see the river" but I could see the South Aberdeen bridge and the thousands of ships leaving the harbor many of them loaded with "old growth timber". The harbor was booming, jobs everywhere, mills ran 24/7....times were good. The demand for wood was high....cut, cut, cut....new ways to mow the trees down faster.

The wife and I attend "Loggers Day" in 1968 and many years after that.....what I remember was 50-60 log trucks with 1 log loads in the parade. I still see log trucks, not very many, but no more 1 log loads.....some times it looks like there are 50 pecker pole logs to a truck log.

Did all the "cutting of trees" cause all the current problems ???? I don't think so, BUT IT SURE HASN'T HELPED. Oh the people that worked and invested thier money have few problems but try to find a job, pretty tough go!!!!




Edited by DrifterWA (06/21/20 12:46 PM)
_________________________

"Worse day sport fishing, still better than the best day working"

"I thought growing older would take longer"

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