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#923986 - 03/02/15 02:10 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET *** [Re: eyeFISH]
milt roe Offline
Spawner

Registered: 01/22/06
Posts: 925
Loc: tacoma
Should be fun to watch as long as the skirmish stays within their 50%.

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#923988 - 03/02/15 02:17 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
eyeFISH Offline
Ornamental Rice Bowl

Registered: 11/24/03
Posts: 12750
Quietly reach a settlement....

YGTBFKM, right?
_________________________
"Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." (Zane Grey)

"If you don't kill them, they will spawn." (Carcassman)


The Keen Eye MD
Long Live the Kings!

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#923994 - 03/02/15 03:54 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 7206
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
Absolutely. WDFW will quietly help them to arrive at a sharing formula that meets their needs.

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#924000 - 03/02/15 04:26 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Salmo g. Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/08/99
Posts: 13471
I don't understand the part of the article indicating this is a suit between the U.S. and WA, when it looks like an inter-tribal dispute. I recall once over 30 years ago the Makah Chairman describing the Makah treaty fishing right entitling the Makah to 50% of all salmon passing by Neah Bay. Of course that would have left zero % for all the Puget Sound treaty tribes. Nice.

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#924006 - 03/02/15 04:54 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 7206
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
Actually, Salmo, that is how WDF interpreted it and it seemed to hold up during fisheries. I recall the Lummis corking the Nooksacks. The right is to 50% of the harvestable number passing through your U&A.

As with water, first in line, first in right.

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#924040 - 03/03/15 07:13 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Carcassman]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Following up on the Grays Harbor Chinook problem last year and the failure to make escapement this additional bit. It is doubtful that either of the comanagers would have caught the Chinook failure in the harvest model until it was to late. I am sure we will dance around that a bit in the coming weeks but Chum was different. A review of the model produced this statement.

I just now looked at Chum. The picture is a bit different. The Chum run started out with less harvest than the plan and by week 43 one would conclude that the run was about 60% of the forecast size.

XXXX


No excuse BOTH the QIN & WDF&W should have caught the failure and did a inseason adjustment. Instead it was "auto pilot" and in simple terms they set on their collectives ass and did nothing. Piss poor management from both!



The bit below was written by a gentleman from Willapa who has been deeply involved in Willapa Estuary issues. I thought I would share it with everyone as he puts forth a perspective not put forth by the state.


Executive Summary

The ecological status of Willapa Bay, Washington, has changed rapidly in the last fifteen years, and not for the better. All of its iconic wild species of animals and plants are in a deteriorated state. These changes are impacted by action of state agencies, recently at an accelerated pace. While the bay suffers from long term neglect of salmon management standards and habitat protection statutes, recent actions are piling on losses at a more alarming rate. Where goals exist, they are not being met. " No net loss of ecological function" is the law of the state. Unmonitored net loss, or monitored with no effective corrective action, has been the practice in Willapa Bay.

Analysis

A major invasion of the plant spartina proceeded over several decades. It was displacing eelgrass and needed to be removed. Suddenly, about year 2000, excess caution was replaced with no caution and a massive spray campaign ensued. As a result, spartina was largely removed, and by 2008 large, collateral damage resulted. Chum salmon and waterfowl immediately declined. During the bulk of spartina removal, eelgrass net loss was not monitored, in keeping with tradition. Only one aerial survey of eelgrass can be found, published in 2007. Even this late survey shows Zostera marina where it is now absent and has never returned. None have been published since. Waterfowl surveys were suspended during the entire spartina campaign. The larger eelgrass, Zostera marina, and the smaller eelgrass, Zostera japonica, which we call "duckgrass" suffered major collateral damage. Pacific Brant, which rely on marina, have never recovered, nor has marina. Duck grass recovered more rapidly in the more suitable areas, as did the ducks that depend on it. Waterfowl surveys, reinstituted in 2012, showed good numbers for two years, followed by a crash in 2014 with the onset of a spray campaign directed at eelgrass. Chum and Chinook salmon escapement of Natural Origin Spawners (NOS) failed to meet WDFW goals starting one spawning cycle after the spartina program did, and have never recovered. The NOS Chinook do not show up in acceptable numbers, and those that do are genetically, statistically, overwhelmed on the spawning beds by by more numerous hatchery fish that are less reliant on bay habitat to survive the juvenile portion of their life cycles. This is now true for every major river in the Willapa Drainage. In the North River they are essentially gone. This is one of the two rivers earmarked for NOS Chinook recovery several years ago, when there were many more present. Poorly situated overharvest finished the job on North River. Endangered Green Sturgeon and white sturgeon are gone from Willapa Bay. We have new leadership in WDFW. It is concentrating on harvest. We have hope. Still, WDFW seems to have little to say about habitat, the other root cause. This must follow.


Historically both species of eelgrass were protected by a state " no net loss" requirement. Their restoration was required, and this was not monitored or enforced. In 2011, WDFW removed duckgrass from protected habitat status. This was the enabler for a chain of events involving multiple state agencies which ended in early 2014 with issuance of a Department of Ecology NPDES permit to chemically remove duckgrass, along with marina on the bed being treated. In keeping with tradition, this permit requires no monitoring on net loss of marina, and no restoration. It is backed by an Environmental Impact Statement that assumes waterfowl forage requirements one thousand times less than truth. The major math "error" that caused this has been pointed out, and remains uncorrected. At the request of the state Department of Ecology, an appeal of this permit has been delayed until October 2015, allowing another year of wide open spraying. In 2014, waterfowl numbers crashed again in Willapa Bay. Along the Long Beach peninsula, where there are normally several thousand ducks at peak, there were 32 widgeon and zero pintail observed. The bay wide peak average of 85,000 over the previous two years dropped to 22,000 in 2014. Such a drop has not been counted in thirty years. In 2014 flyway numbers were above average, but not in Willapa Bay. In Puget Sound eelgrass is being restored, while it is being removed in Willapa Bay. Both species are protected in Puget Sound, although Ecology has now asked them not to.

To the casual observer, it must seem shocking that things can happen so fast, with spraying that "should" be diluted by tides and carried out to sea. This was the claim of the state permit's impact statement. Actually, bad things can happen fast because Willapa Bay has a peculiar circulation pattern which moves seawater and pollutants with a net inflow on the west side. It goes south of a dispersion or low flushing zone and stays there for many weeks. The average age of water south of Nahcotta and Bay Center is 45 to 60 days. Eventually this water and contents are carried back out on the east side to the North. When a certain seasoned oceanographer pointed this out, the state attorney general labeled him unqualified to speak. Back in the day, such estuarine types were called Vertical Boundary Estuaries. Today a more recent UW paper on Willapa Bay has different labels, but has shown exactly the circulation of such an estuary. It contains exquisite detail, makes the same points about flushing and circulation, and receives the same state consideration, i.e. none. Apparently DOE has repealed density gradients and Coriolis Force, along with fish biology and waterfowl carrying capacity math. Chemicals that, in minute concentrations, can retard plant growth without killing or deforming, are circulated and retained in a situation that should be alarming. The ducks knew the condition of their food, ate what little was there, and left. Salmon and sturgeon are stuck in this cycle. With any overharvesting, they just disappear.

After ten years of " no targeted harvest", chum salmon, which used to fill a bay with a carrying capacity of 80,000 to 200,000 now cannot make an escapement goal of 35,000 fish. Chinook have made their escapement goal once in fifteen years. Brant are almost gone. Ducks are at a 30 year low. Sturgeon are gone, with zero retention allowed. Green sturgeon are endangered. After a few decades of removal of their favorite forage, burrowing shrimp, it is over for them. We now can see that carrying capacity, in addition to harvest control, is the key to all of the above and the bay has lost much carrying capacity for our iconic species. They all depend directly or indirectly on eelgrass. This key habitat is being removed under state permits and negligence of our own standards.

The waters of Willapa Bay were put here by the world's great flood. Under the waters are the eelgrasses. Under the grass are their words. How long will these words haunt us?






Edited by Rivrguy (03/03/15 09:58 AM)
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

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#924043 - 03/03/15 07:20 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 7206
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
The Washington Department of Salmon really doesn't give a rip about the other species that might inhabit WB. Besides, hatcheries can produce Chinook and coho, which are the only meaningfully important species. The rest are just background noise.

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#924045 - 03/03/15 08:00 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Smalma Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/25/01
Posts: 2838
Loc: Marysville
Riverguy -
An interesting read and the reported lack of monitoring is concerning.

That said I would remind folks that Zostera japonica like the spartina is an exotic plant (historically found along the Asian coast). While I don't know much about either species of eel grass I can certainly see a situation where controlling the "duckgrass" would be necessary to allow the native (marina) eel grass and the ecosystem benefits it provides the opportunity to recover.

Curt

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#924283 - 03/05/15 02:13 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Smalma]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/fisheries/willapa_bay_salmon/

The latest Willapa draft is out for comment and the link is above. More to come I am sure but here are the major changes.



Fall Chinook Salmon: Alternative A
(No Area 2T, 2U Commercial Fishery in August after Transition Period)

Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage fall Chinook salmon fisheries and hatchery programs consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following additional guidance:

1) The Department shall initiate a three-phase rebuilding program to conserve and restore wild Chinook salmon in Willapa Bay. The progressive series of actions is intended to result in achieving broodstock management standards by year 5 and spawner goals by years 16-21. Within the conservation constraints of the rebuilding program, Chinook salmon will be managed to provide for a full recreational fishing season with increased participation and/or catch anticipated in future years.

2) Rebuilding Program - Phase 1 (Years 1-4). The objectives of Phase 1 shall be to increase the number of natural-origin spawners and implement hatchery program modifications designed to meet broodstock management standards in the subsequent cycle.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa River natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 20% to initiate rebuilding of the number of natural-origin spawners.

b. Implement hatchery broodstock management actions to promote re-adaptation to the natural environment and enhance productivity of natural-origin Chinook salmon in the North/Smith, Willapa, and Naselle rivers:

North/Smith Manage as Wild Salmon Management Zone with no hatchery releases of Chinook salmon.

Willapa Implement an integrated program with hatchery broodstock management strategies designed to achieve broodstock management standards consistent with a Primary designation in the subsequent cycle.

Naselle Implement a stepping stone program to promote local adaptation. The highly integrated program of 300,000 will be derived from at least 70% natural-origin broodstock. The Department shall continue to enhance weir operations with a goal of limiting hatchery-origin adults to less than 30% of the natural spawners above the weir.

c. Pursue implementation of additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear to enhance conservation and provide harvest opportunities. The Department shall provide to the Commission by January 2017 a status report and by January 2018 an assessment of options to implement additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear in Willapa Bay. The assessment shall identify the likely release



mortality rates for each gear type, the benefits to rebuilding naturally spawning populations, and the benefits and impacts to the commercial fishery.

3) Rebuilding Program - Phase 2 (Years 5 - 10). The objectives of Phase 2 shall be to increase the number and productivity of natural-origin spawners through a further reduction in harvest rates and continued implementation of the broodstock management strategies discussed above.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa River natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 14% to accelerate the rebuilding program.

b. Evaluate hatchery broodstock management actions for consistency with the objectives identified in 2(b), including the proportionate natural influence in the Willapa River and incorporation of natural-origin broodstock into the stepping stone program in the Naselle River.

4) Rebuilding Program - Phase 3 (Years 11 21). The combination of fishery and harvest management actions is projected to result on average in the achievement of spawner goals for the North & Willapa populations in the years 16-21. Additional fishery and hatchery management actions will be considered during this time period if the progress toward the spawner objectives is inconsistent with expectations.

5) Fishery Management Objectives. The fishery management objectives for fall Chinook salmon, in priority order, are to:

a. Achieve spawner goals for the primary stocks of natural-origin Chinook and hatchery reform broodstock objectives through the three phase rebuilding program described above.

b. Provide for a full recreational fishing season. The impact rate of the recreational fishery is anticipated to be ~3.2% during the initial years of the policy, but may increase in subsequent years to provide for a full recreational season as described below:

A full marine recreational season means that Willapa Bay will be open concurrent with Area 2, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of six fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

A full freshwater recreational season means an opening on August 1 in the Willapa, Nemah, and Naselle rivers, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of four fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

Conservation actions, as necessary, shall be shared equally between marine and freshwater fisheries.




c. Provide opportunities for commercial fisheries within the remaining available fishery impacts.

6) Fishery Management in Phase 1. To facilitate a transition to the Willapa River as the primary Chinook salmon population, fisheries during the transition period will be managed with the following intent:

a. The impact rate on Willapa River natural-origin fall Chinook in Willapa Bay fisheries shall not exceed 20%. Within this impact rate cap, the priority shall be to maintain a full season of recreational fisheries for Chinook salmon in the Willapa Bay Basin

b. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2T and 2U prior to Labor Day. Commercial fisheries in areas 2T and 2U after Labor Day but before Sept. 16 shall use mark-selective fishing gear (6.5 maximum mesh in 2T and 4.5 maximum mesh tangle net in 2U) and recovery boxes.

c. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R prior to August 16.

7) Fishery Management After Phase 1. Fisheries in the Willapa Bay Basin during the Chinook salmon management period (prior to September 16) will be managed with the intent of:

a. Limiting the fishery impact rate on Willapa River natural-origin fall Chinook salmon to no more than 14%.

b. No commercial fisheries shall occur within areas 2T and 2U prior to September. 16.

c. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R prior to August 16.

8) Hatchery Production. Within budgetary constraints, and at the earliest feasible date, the Department shall seek to implement the following hatchery production of fall Chinook salmon:

3.30 million at Naselle Hatchery
i. 300,000 highly integrated
ii. 3 million from first generation returns of highly integrated stock
3.30 million at Nemah Hatchery
0.35 million at Forks Creek Hatchery

9) Enhanced Hatchery Production. The Department shall work with our partners to secure



resources to increase production of fall Chinook salmon at Naselle Hatchery by an additional 2.7 million subyearlings.


Edited by Rivrguy (03/05/15 02:29 PM)
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

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#924291 - 03/05/15 05:08 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Geoduck Offline
Returning Adult

Registered: 08/10/02
Posts: 437
What a disaster for the Rec fleet
_________________________
Dig Deep!

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#924293 - 03/05/15 05:27 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Geoduck]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Running out of time but that above is option I. I will C&P 2&3 tomorrow.
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

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#924317 - 03/05/15 10:31 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Rivrguy]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope

OPTION B

Fall Chinook Salmon: Alternative B
(Area 2T Commercial Fishery in Early-August)

Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage fall Chinook salmon fisheries and hatchery programs consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following additional guidance:

1) The Department shall initiate a three-phase rebuilding program to conserve and restore wild Chinook salmon in Willapa Bay. The progressive series of actions is intended to result in achieving broodstock management standards by year 5 and spawner goals by years 16-21. Within the conservation constraints of the rebuilding program, Chinook salmon will be managed to provide for a full recreational fishing season with increased participation and/or catch anticipated in future years.

2) Rebuilding Program - Phase 1 (Years 1-4). The objectives of Phase 1 shall be to increase the number of natural-origin spawners and implement hatchery program modifications designed to meet broodstock management standards in the subsequent cycle.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa River natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 20% to initiate rebuilding of the number of natural-origin spawners.

b. Implement hatchery broodstock management actions to promote re-adaptation to the natural environment and enhance productivity of natural-origin Chinook salmon in the North/Smith, Willapa, and Naselle rivers:

North/Smith Manage as Wild Salmon Management Zone with no hatchery releases of Chinook salmon.

Willapa Implement an integrated program with hatchery broodstock management strategies designed to achieve broodstock management standards consistent with a Primary designation in the subsequent cycle.

Naselle Implement a stepping stone program to promote local adaptation. The highly integrated program of 300,000 will be derived from at least 70% natural-origin broodstock. The Department shall continue to enhance weir operations with a goal of limiting hatchery-origin adults to less than 30% of the natural spawners above the weir.

c. Pursue implementation of additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear to enhance conservation and provide harvest opportunities. The Department shall provide to the Commission by January 2017 a status report and by January 2018 an assessment of options to implement additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear in Willapa Bay. The assessment shall identify the likely release



mortality rates for each gear type, the benefits to rebuilding naturally spawning populations, and the benefits and impacts to the commercial fishery.

3) Rebuilding Program - Phase 2 (Years 5 - 10). The objectives of Phase 2 shall be to increase the number and productivity of natural-origin spawners through a further reduction in harvest rates and continued implementation of the broodstock management strategies discussed above.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa River natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 14% to accelerate the rebuilding program.

b. Evaluate hatchery broodstock management actions for consistency with the objectives identified in 2(b), including the proportionate natural influence in the Willapa River and incorporation of natural-origin broodstock into the stepping stone program in the Naselle River.

4) Rebuilding Program - Phase 3 (Years 11 21). The combination of fishery and harvest management actions is projected to result on average in the achievement of spawner goals for the North & Willapa populations in the years 16-21. Additional fishery and hatchery management actions will be considered during this time period if the progress toward the spawner objectives is inconsistent with expectations.

5) Fishery Management Objectives. The fishery management objectives for fall Chinook salmon, in priority order, are to:

a. Achieve spawner goals for the primary stocks of natural-origin Chinook and hatchery reform broodstock objectives through the three phase rebuilding program described above.

b. Provide for a full recreational fishing season. The impact rate of the recreational fishery is anticipated to be ~3.2% during the initial years of the policy, but may increase in subsequent years to provide for a full recreational season as described below:

A full marine recreational season means that Willapa Bay will be open concurrent with Area 2, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of six fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

A full freshwater recreational season means an opening on August 1 in the Willapa, Nemah, and Naselle rivers, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of four fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

Conservation actions, as necessary, shall be shared equally between marine and freshwater fisheries.




c. Provide opportunities for commercial fisheries within the remaining available fishery impacts.

6) Fishery Management in Phase 1. To facilitate a transition to the Willapa River as the primary Chinook salmon population, fisheries during the transition period will be managed with the following intent:

a. The impact rate on Willapa River natural-origin fall Chinook in Willapa Bay fisheries shall not exceed 20%. Within this impact rate cap, the priority shall be to maintain a full season of recreational fisheries for Chinook salmon in the Willapa Bay Basin.

b. Commercial fisheries may occur within the remaining allowable impacts, but no commercial fisheries shall occur prior to August 1.

c. Commercial fisheries between August 1 and August 15 shall be limited to 72 consecutive hours and may occur in all areas except Area 2U.

d. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in area 2T August 16 through Labor Day. Commercial fisheries in area 2T after Labor Day but before Sept. 16 shall use mark-selective fishing gear and recovery boxes. Commercial fisheries in area 2U prior to Sept. 16 shall use mark-selective fishing gear (4.5 maximum mesh tangle net) and recovery boxes.

e. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R from August 16 until after Labor Day.

7) Fishery Management After Phase 1. Fisheries in the Willapa Bay Basin during the Chinook salmon management period (prior to September 16) will be managed with the intent of:

a. Limiting the fishery impact rate on Willapa River natural-origin fall Chinook salmon to no more than 14%.

b. Commercial fisheries may occur within the remaining allowable impacts, but no commercial fisheries shall occur prior to August 1.

c. Commercial fisheries between August 1 and August 15 shall be limited to 72 consecutive hours and may occur in all areas except Area 2U.

d. No commercial fisheries shall occur in Areas 2T and 2U from August 16 through September 16.

e. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R from



August 16 until after Labor Day.

8) Hatchery Production. Within budgetary constraints, and at the earliest feasible date, the Department shall seek to implement the following hatchery production of fall Chinook salmon:

3.30 million at Naselle Hatchery
i. 300,000 highly integrated
ii. 3 million from first generation returns of highly integrated stock
3.30 million at Nemah Hatchery
0.35 million at Forks Creek Hatchery

9) Enhanced Hatchery Production. The Department shall work with our partners to secure resources to increase production of fall Chinook salmon at Naselle Hatchery by an additional 2.7 million subyearlings.
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

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#924318 - 03/05/15 10:32 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Rivrguy]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope

OPTION C

Fall Chinook Salmon: Alternative C (Naselle Contributing)

Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage fall Chinook salmon fisheries and hatchery programs consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following additional guidance:

1) The Department shall initiate a three-phase rebuilding program to conserve and restore wild Chinook salmon in Willapa Bay. The progressive series of actions is intended to result in achieving broodstock management standards by year 5 and spawner goals by years 16-21. Within the conservation constraints of the rebuilding program, Chinook salmon will be managed to provide for a full recreational fishing season with increased participation and/or catch anticipated in future years.

2) Rebuilding Program - Phase 1 (Years 1-4). The objectives of Phase 1 shall be to increase the number of natural-origin spawners and implement hatchery program modifications designed to meet broodstock management standards in the subsequent cycle.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa and Naselle river natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 20% to initiate rebuilding of the number of natural-origin spawners.

b. Implement hatchery broodstock management actions to promote re-adaptation to the natural environment and enhance productivity of natural-origin Chinook salmon in the North/Smith, Willapa, and Naselle rivers:

North/Smith Manage as Wild Salmon Management Zone with no hatchery releases of Chinook salmon.

Willapa Implement an integrated program with hatchery broodstock management strategies designed to achieve broodstock management standards consistent with a Primary designation in the subsequent cycle.

Naselle Implement hatchery broodstock strategies designed to achieve broodstock management standards consistent with a Contributing designation in the subsequent cycle.

c. Pursue implementation of additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear to enhance conservation and provide harvest opportunities. The Department shall provide to the Commission by January 2017 a status report and by January 2018 an assessment of options to implement additional mark-selective commercial fishing gear in Willapa Bay. The assessment shall identify the likely release mortality rates for each gear type, the benefits to rebuilding naturally spawning populations, and the benefits and impacts to the commercial fishery.



3) Rebuilding Program - Phase 2 (Years 5 - 10). The objectives of Phase 2 shall be to increase the number and productivity of natural-origin spawners through a further reduction in harvest rates and continued implementation of the broodstock management strategies discussed above.

a. Limit harvest rates on Willapa and Naselle river natural-origin Chinook salmon to no more than 14% to accelerate the rebuilding program.

b. Evaluate hatchery broodstock management actions for consistency with the objectives identified in 2(b), including the proportionate natural influence in the Willapa and Naselle rivers.

4) Rebuilding Program - Phase 3 (Years 11 21). The combination of fishery and harvest management actions is projected to result on average in the achievement of spawner goals for the North & Willapa populations in the years 16-21. Additional fishery and hatchery management actions will be considered during this time period if the progress toward the spawner objectives is inconsistent with expectations.

5) Fishery Management Objectives. The fishery management objectives for fall Chinook salmon, in priority order, are to:

a. Achieve spawner goals for the primary stocks of natural-origin Chinook and hatchery reform broodstock objectives through the three phase rebuilding program described above.

b. Provide for a full recreational fishing season. The impact rate of the recreational fishery is anticipated to be ~3.2% during the initial years of the policy, but may increase in subsequent years to provide for a full recreational season as described below:

A full marine recreational season means that Willapa Bay will be open concurrent with Area 2, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of six fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

A full freshwater recreational season means an opening on August 1 on the Willapa, Nemah, and Naselle rivers, two rods will be allowed per angler, a daily bag limit of four fish, with release of unclipped Chinook salmon.

Conservation actions, as necessary, shall be shared equally between marine and freshwater fisheries.

c. Provide opportunities for commercial fisheries within the remaining available fishery impacts.



6) Fishery Management in Phase 1. To facilitate a transition to the Willapa River as the primary Chinook salmon population, fisheries during the transition period will be managed with the following intent:

a. The impact rate on Willapa and Naselle river natural-origin fall Chinook in Willapa Bay fisheries shall not exceed 20%. Within this impact rate cap, the priority shall be to maintain a full season of recreational fisheries for Chinook salmon in the Willapa Bay Basin.

b. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2T and 2U prior to Labor Day. Commercial fisheries in areas 2T and 2U after Labor Day but before Sept. 16 shall use mark-selective fishing gear (6.5 maximum mesh in 2T and 4.5 maximum mesh tangle net in 2U) and recovery boxes.

c. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R until after Labor Day.

7) Fishery Management After Phase 1. Fisheries in the Willapa Bay Basin during the Chinook salmon management period (prior to September 16) will be managed with the intent of:

a. Limiting the fishery impact rate on Willapa and Naselle river natural-origin fall Chinook salmon to no more than 14%.

b. No commercial fisheries shall occur within areas 2T and 2U prior to September. 16.

c. No commercial Chinook fisheries shall occur in areas 2M, 2N, 2P and 2R until after September 7.

8) Hatchery Production. Within budgetary constraints, and at the earliest feasible date, the Department shall seek to implement the following hatchery production of fall Chinook salmon:

0.70 million at Naselle Hatchery
3.30 million at Nemah Hatchery
0.35 million at Forks Creek Hatchery
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

Top
#924333 - 03/06/15 11:04 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
Carcassman Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 7206
Loc: Olema,California,Planet Earth
As you read the options and comment be careful of EVERY word. "May", "should", "could", "might", "in the future" are all ways to make folks think one way while actually sending the bus down a different road.

A few years ago, I believe R6 said they could do in-season management of commercial fisheries. When asked why the didn't actually do anything the response was "we said we could, we didn't say we would."

While flexibility is nice, the more flexible you make the plan the less it will serve the fish.

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#924348 - 03/06/15 03:27 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: eyeFISH]
FleaFlickr02 Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 3264
Good call, Carcassman. All such words must be replaced with "will" or "shall" if the rules are to have any teeth.

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#924436 - 03/08/15 04:10 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: FleaFlickr02]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Nothing new in the draft in the Coho language but Chum is different. I will be going with 3B highlighted. Additionally look at 2C and see they are trying to lock the Rec into going only with directed commercial harvest. Load of BS because then the commercial will take many thousands as incidental. Cheap shot by agency staff on that one and going after that BS.

Chum Salmon
Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage Chum salmon fisheries and hatchery programs consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

1) Broodstock Management Strategies. Manage Chum salmon with the following designations and broodstock management strategies:

North/Smith Palix Bear
Designation Primary Contributing Primary
Broodstock Strategy No Hatchery Program No Hatchery Program No Hatchery Program

Chum salmon returning to all other watersheds will be managed consistent with a Contributing designation.

2) Fishery Management Objectives. The fishery management objectives for Chum salmon, in priority order, are to:

a. Achieve the aggregate goal for naturally spawning Chum salmon and meet hatchery reform broodstock objectives (see bullet 3);

b. Provide commercial fishing opportunities during the Chum salmon fishery management period (October 15 through October 31); and

c. Provide recreational fishing opportunities. Recreational fisheries will be allowed to retain Chum salmon if retention is not prohibited in the commercial fishery.

3) Fisheries will be managed with the intent of achieving the aggregate goal for Willapa Bay naturally spawning Chum salmon.

a. Option A: Until the spawner goal is achieved, the maximum fishery impact shall not exceed a 10% harvest rate and no commercial fisheries will occur in the period from October 15-31. If the aggregate goal has been achieved, but the pre-season forecast of adult Chum salmon is less than the aggregate goal, or less than 10% higher than the aggregate goal, fisheries in the Willapa Bay Basin will be scheduled to result in an impact of no more than 10% of the adult return.

b. Option B: Until the spawner goal is achieved 2 consecutive years, the maximum fishery impact shall not exceed a 10% harvest rate and no commercial fisheries will occur in the period from October 15-31. If the number of natural-origin spawners was less than the goal in 3 out of the last 5 years, the Department shall implement the following measures:



i. The predicted fishery impact for Chum in Willapa Bay Basin will be scheduled to result in an impact of no more than 10% of the adult return.
ii. When the Chum pre-season forecast is 90% or less of the escapement goal, the predicted fishery impact for Chum in Willapa Bay Basin will be scheduled to result in an impact of no more than 5% of the adult return.

4) The Department shall evaluate opportunities to increase hatchery production of Chum salmon. If Chum salmon hatchery production is enhanced, beginning as early as 2018, fisheries in the Willapa Bay Basin may be implemented with a fishery impact limit of no more than 33% of the natural-origin Chum salmon return.



Edited by Rivrguy (03/08/15 05:06 AM)
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#924437 - 03/08/15 05:52 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Rivrguy]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Back to Grays Harbor. This is proposal for a two pole endorsement for a portion of the Chehalis River. Now before someone's panties get in a knot it is best to remember we have no conservation issue on the Chehalis this year. Also as stated in the proposal commercials have pointed out consistently the Rec inriver cannot catch their share. The Rec response is you keep limiting our ability to harvest our share by restricting our harvest. This is a effort to move the ability to access the inriver share of the harvest.

I cannot tell anyone the impact projection as twice I have asked for the harvest model and have yet to have it provided. This is a issue and I will ask again tomorrow. Additionally my request to input the proposal in the model has been ignored and this I will also put tp R6 staff tomorrow.


Proposal For Two Pole Endorsement For The Chehalis River

PROPOSAL: To allow two poles per angler when fishing from a boat in the Chehalis River from South Elma Bridge to Highway 101 Bridge in Aberdeen.

RATIONAL: In many meetings agency staff have identified that the inriver recreational fishery has limited ability to get substantially more catch. This is primarily due to restrictions placed upon the inriver recreational fisher that limit harvest success. The use of two poles simply allows for the presentation of different tackle enabling the fisher to identify "what is working" with greater success. Additionally when fishing from a boat salmon track differently depending on conditions and at times it can be just a few feet. Two poles allows the fisher to cover more water thus increasing the potential of finding the route salmon are traveling in the river with greater success.

CONSERVATION ISSUES: None exist.

ENFORCEMENT ISSUES: None exist as two poles can clearly be seen and any issues would be addressed at the same time a Enforcement Officer checked for a fishers license, barbless hook, limit violations, or any other issue an Enforcement Officer may encounter.


FROM THE PAMPHLET:
1. In general, two-pole fishing is not allowed in saltwater, or in rivers, streams and beaver ponds. However, WDFW is always evaluating areas and times when surplus fish may be available for harvest and the two-pole option could be allowed.


2. Two-Pole Endorsement: This endorsement allows you to use two fishing poles on most freshwater lakes, ponds, a few sections of certain rivers, and a few marine areas. You must have a fishing license in addition to the endorsement.

There are about 145 lakes where you can NOT use two poles; visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/twopole to see the list of lakes where a Two-Pole Endorsement is not valid, or look for this icon NO next to the lake listings. You can NOT use two poles in most rivers and marine areas. See individual stream and marine area listings for information where you can use two poles. Not required on Free Fishing Weekend.



Edited by Rivrguy (03/08/15 06:07 AM)
_________________________
Dazed and confused.............the fog is closing in

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#924723 - 03/10/15 01:53 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Rivrguy]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Reminder for the Grays Harbor NOF meeting for the 2015 fall salmon seasons. Preseason forecast is out and many are working away to get the maximum benefit for the Rec fisher be it bay or inriver. So lets all show up that can.


March 11

Grays Harbor Fisheries Discussion
6 p.m.-9 p.m., Montesano City Hall, 112 N Main Street, Montesano
Public discussion of Grays Harbor salmon forecasts and fishing opportunities.
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#925016 - 03/12/15 10:12 PM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Smalma]
Ohop Joe Offline
Fry

Registered: 10/27/11
Posts: 23
Originally Posted By: Smalma
Riverguy -
An interesting read and the reported lack of monitoring is concerning.

That said I would remind folks that Zostera japonica like the spartina is an exotic plant (historically found along the Asian coast). While I don't know much about either species of eel grass I can certainly see a situation where controlling the "duckgrass" would be necessary to allow the native (marina) eel grass and the ecosystem benefits it provides the opportunity to recover.

Curt


All of the oysters that folks are growing and removing the spartina for are exotic as as well. Unfortunately they are not providing any benefit to the greater ecosystem which some scientists for the NOAA science center have pointed out before, unlike the bad bad spartina. Single-species ecosystem management failures at its finest.

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#925031 - 03/13/15 10:32 AM Re: FISHINGTHECHEHALIS.NET [Re: Ohop Joe]
Rivrguy Offline
River Nutrients

Registered: 03/03/09
Posts: 4281
Loc: Somewhere on the planet,I hope
Where are we at in the GH & Willapa NOF process? Well Willapa is on hold until staff get guidance from the Commission on a interim harvest policy. The Grays Harbor season setting process is slowly going forward with the usual discord but so far staff has tried to get it right and stick to the management plan. For some used to the old ways where a select group have a disproportionate influence on the outcome it has been difficult. For myself and others it has been a journey to learn rules are rules and words have meaning. They tell you what you can and cannot do, not the old way of personal perception or ones favorite fishery maintained at the expense of another fishery as in the past. Believe me when I say those that had that influence in the past are NOT taking it well.

We have some issues to work around as we are in the 3/5 "penalty box". Now 3/5 is if we fail to make escapement 3 out of 5 years regardless of the number forecasted harvestable, only a 5% impact on that species in areas A,B, & D. For the Chehalis Chinook it is now at 4 out of 5 missing the escapement mark. So we are in the 3/5 "penalty box". In the Humptulips it is Natural Origin Coho (wild) that is pulling us down as they have not made escapement for over 20 years.

In the past most that put conservation first struggled with the concept that "all paper fish must die" The difference this year from past years is the fact that the Grays Harbor Management Plan requires 3 days a week net free (4/3) which makes for a real inriver Rec fishery and is a safety net for the fish if we blow the projected impacts in the harvest model.

So the Grays Harbor season setting process is slowly moving forward. With the wide spread in options thus far it is not worth the effort to do a detailed analysis until staff puts forth what is going into the CR 102. ( the CR 102 is the legal part to set the WAC / legal seasons & bag limits )

So as I said things are moving forward with much more to come I am sure. Steve Theisfeld has put out 4 harvest model runs for review and if anyone wants them PM me and I will forward them to you.


Edited by Rivrguy (03/13/15 10:33 AM)
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